No credible evidence to support cardiac risk of testosterone therapy

No credible evidence to support cardiac risk of testosterone therapy
Credit: 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Recent articles in the scientific literature and mass media that question the use of testosterone (T) therapy to treat T deficiency, or "low T," and assert the cardiovascular risks of T therapy, are flawed, according to a provocative Guest Editorial in Journal of Men's Health.

In "Testosterone Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk: A Cautionary Tale" Martin Miner, MD, The Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University (Providence, RI), Joel Heidelbaugh, MD, University of Michigan Medical School (Ann Arbor), and Abraham Morgentaler, MD, Harvard Medical School (Boston, MA), state, "We object to comments that question the reality of T deficiency, regardless of whether it is called hypogonadism or, as in advertisements, 'low T.'"

More data from larger, longer term studies are needed to assess potential effects of on in men. Based on the current evidence, the authors state, "we can find no foundation for suggesting new restrictions on T therapy in men with cardiac disease."

More information: The article is available free on the Journal of Men's Health website at http://www.liebertpub.com/jmh.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Are human breast milk microbiome 'neutral'?

13 minutes ago

Human breast milk is considered the most ideal source of nutrition for infants and it should have played a critical role in the evolution and civilizations of human beings. Unlike our intuitive perception, human milk contains ...

Many nurses unprepared to meet dying patients

2 hours ago

Most nurses in their work care for patients who are dying. A study of more than 200 students has shown that many nurses in training feel unprepared and anxious when faced with the prospect of meeting patients during end-of-life ...

Spinach extract decreases cravings, aids weight loss

2 hours ago

A spinach extract containing green leaf membranes called thylakoids decreases hedonic hunger with up to 95% - and increases weight loss with 43%. This has been shown in a recently published long-term human study at Lund University ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Ratfish
not rated yet May 05, 2014
You mean to say that the male gender isn't itself a disease state? Frankly, I'm floored.