Depression tied to Crohn's disease flare-ups

Depression tied to crohn's disease flare-ups
Doctors should be aware of body-mind connection with the inflammatory bowel condition, study author says.

(HealthDay)—Depression may increase the risk of Crohn's disease flare-ups in people with the inflammatory bowel disorder, an early new study suggests.

The study included about 3,150 Crohn's patients who completed online questionnaires about their disease, its treatment and how it affects their lives. They were also asked about how often they felt hopeless, sad, helpless or worthless.

Patients with high depression scores were 50 percent more likely than those with low depression scores to have a Crohn's disease flare-up 12 months later, the researchers said.

After the researchers adjusted for other risk factors, the link between depression and Crohn's flare-ups remained significant, according to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation-sponsored study. It's scheduled to be presented Saturday at the Digestive Disease Week meeting, in Chicago.

While the study found an association between having and a higher risk of flare-ups among people with Crohn's disease, it did not establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

"Our study suggests that feelings of sadness and thoughts of helplessness, hopelessness and worthlessness can affect the risk of disease flares in people with Crohn's disease," lead author Lawrence Gaines, an associate professor of psychiatry and medicine at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, said in a foundation news release.

"For these patients, what they think about themselves may be related to a very real medical outcome," he added.

This is the first evidence that depression is linked with increased Crohn's disease activity a year later, according to Gaines. He added that doctors treating patients with Crohn's disease need to be aware that patients' feelings about themselves can have an impact on the course of their disease.

"Gastroenterologists should be asking about depression and how their disease is affecting the way they feel about their lives, not just their disease," Gaines said.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, it should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information: The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about Crohn's disease.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Impaired sleep ups risk of relapse in Crohn's disease

Aug 08, 2013

(HealthDay)—For patients with Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis, sleep impairment is associated with increased risk of relapse, according to a study published in the August issue Clinical Ga ...

Recommended for you

Aspirin shown to benefit schizophrenia treatment

10 minutes ago

A new study shows that some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments. This work is being presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology ...

Fairness is in the brain

27 minutes ago

Ever wondered how people figure out what is fair? Look to the brain for the answer. According to a new Norwegian brain study, people appreciate fairness in much the same way as they appreciate money for themselves, ...

Something in the way we move

39 minutes ago

Being depressed is depressing in itself and makes you feel even worse. That is one reason why it is so hard to break out of depressive conditions.

User comments