Diets rich in antioxidant resveratrol fail to reduce deaths, heart disease or cancer

Skeletal formula of trans-resveratrol. Image: Wikipedia

A study of Italians who consume a diet rich in resveratrol—the compound found in red wine, dark chocolate and berries—finds they live no longer than and are just as likely to develop cardiovascular disease or cancer as those who eat or drink smaller amounts of the antioxidant.

"The story of resveratrol turns out to be another case where you get a lot of hype about health benefits that doesn't stand the test of time," says Richard D. Semba, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and leader of the study described May 12 in JAMA Internal Medicine. "The thinking was that certain foods are good for you because they contain resveratrol. We didn't find that at all."

Despite the negative results, Semba says, studies have shown that consumption of , and berries does reduce inflammation in some people and still appears to protect the heart. "It's just that the benefits, if they are there, must come from other polyphenols or substances found in those foodstuffs," he says. "These are complex foods, and all we really know from our study is that the benefits are probably not due to resveratrol."

The new study did not include people taking resveratrol supplements, though few studies thus far have found benefits associated with them.

Semba is part of an international team of researchers that for 15 years has studied the effects of aging in a group of people who live in the Chianti region of Italy. For the current study, the researchers analyzed 24 hours of from 783 people over the age of 65 for metabolites of resveratrol. After accounting for such factors as age and gender, the people with the highest concentration of resveratrol metabolites were no less likely to have died of any cause than those with no resveratrol found in their urine. The concentration of resveratrol was not associated with inflammatory markers, or cancer rates.

Semba and his colleagues used advanced mass spectrometry to analyze the urine samples.

The study participants make up a random group of people living in Tuscany where supplement use is uncommon and consumption of red wine—a specialty of the region—is the norm. The study participants were not on any prescribed diet.

Resveratrol is also found in relatively large amounts in grapes, peanuts and certain Asiatic plant roots. Excitement over its followed studies documenting anti-inflammatory effects in lower organisms and increased lifespan in mice fed a high-calorie diet rich in the compound.

The so-called "French paradox," in which a low incidence of coronary heart disease occurs in the presence of a high dietary intake of cholesterol and saturated fat in France, has been attributed to the regular consumption of and other polyphenols found in red wine.

More information: JAMA Intern Med. Published online May 12, 2014. DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1582

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Caliban
not rated yet May 12, 2014
"The story of resveratrol turns out to be another case where you get a lot of hype about health benefits that doesn't stand the test of time," says Richard D. Semba, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine...


The story of resveratrol turns out to be the same as it does for any other overhyped food, supplement, or drug, my dear Doctor Semba --moderation in all things is the answer, not overconsumption of some substance as a panacea to our poor life choices.

But of course Big Food'n'Pharma is happy to help us think so, because of all the sweet, sweet $$$ they can pocket by engineering demand an pricejacking.

Speak truth to Corporate Interests, Dr Semba, and don't blame the otherwise innocent and beneficial for the stupidity and gullibility of people.
kochevnik
not rated yet May 12, 2014
I consumed one substance and my skin looks ten years younger after less than a month. Women are noticing. Also losing weight because I burn fat better, again in three weeks. Only problem is my prostate stopped assisting my penis for a while, so a date may consist of chick flicks and love ballets
Dug
not rated yet May 19, 2014
There are several decades of clinical evidence that reserveratrol has measurable health benefits. The bad news here was that a noted medical institution allowed this kind of exceptionally poor designed study to be published in its journal. If reporters and readers with any critical thinking skills had scrutinized this report they would have asked if researchers had adjusted for the fact that more than three times as many study participants smoked tobacco in the heavy wine-drinking group (25.1%) versus teetotalers and occasional wine drinkers (7.7%). This is just exceptionally poor experimental design and gross professional incompetence - or outright competitive agenda and bias. It surely is only a coincidence that the study's authors were ophthalmologists - and recent studies have found that reserveratrol had very positive impacts on macular degeneration. Another major effort to rid the public and their profits from nutritional supplement competition by big pharma.