Planned disruptions may reduce workplace sitting time

May 13, 2014
Planned disruptions may reduce workplace sitting time

(HealthDay)—An intervention to disrupt prolonged sitting time seems to result in less sitting in the workplace, according to a study published online May 1 in the U.S. Centers for Disease and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

Ann M. Swartz, Ph.D., from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and colleagues examined the impact of a intervention to disrupt . They randomized 60 office workers to a Stand group (29 participants), which received hourly prompts to stand up, or to a Step group (31 participants), which received the same prompts plus a reminder to walk 100 steps upon standing.

The researchers found that there were significant reductions in both groups in the number and duration of sitting bouts. Significant reductions were seen in the Stand group for total sitting time (6.6 percent), duration of the longest sitting bout (29 percent), and the number of sitting bouts lasting 30 minutes or longer (13 percent), while increases were seen in the number of sit-to-stand transitions (15 percent) and standing time (23 percent). Significant increases in stepping time occurred in the Stand and Step groups (14 and 39 percent, respectively), but only the Step group had a significant increase in the number of steps per workday (35 percent). There were no significant differences in changes from baseline to between the groups.

"Interventions that focus on disrupting sitting time only in the workplace may result in less sitting," the authors write.

More information: Full Text

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