Dyspnea increases long-term mortality risk

May 19, 2014

Individuals with dyspnea, or shortness of breath, have an increased long-term mortality risk compared with individuals without dyspnea, according to a new study presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference.

"Dyspnea may be an indicator of serious underlying disease," said lead author Gene Pesola, MD, MPH, of Columbia University in New York. "In our study of nearly 12,000 individuals who were followed for up to 12 years, we found that those who had at baseline had a greater risk of dying, even after adjusting our analyses for other for mortality, including smoking."

The population-based study included 11,746 subjects who were recruited between 2000 and 2002 in rural Bangladesh. During 12 years of follow-up, there were 782 deaths. Before adjustment for other possible risk factors, subjects with dyspnea at baseline had a 2.73-fold increased risk of dying compared with those without dyspnea at baseline.

After adjustment for age, gender, education, (BMI), smoking, arsenic concentrations in drinking water and blood pressure, dyspnea remained associated with a significant 2.10-fold increased risk of death. When nonsmokers were analyzed separately, dyspnea was associated with a 1.9-fold increased risk of death.

Smoking, male sex, and elevated BMI were also associated with an increased .

"Dyspnea may be a sign of lung disease, heart disease, or a number of other potentially life-threatening conditions," said Dr. Pesola. "Identifying the underlying causes of dyspnea in these individuals might offer an opportunity to reduce the high risk of mortality associated with this condition."

Explore further: Opioids effective in relieving severe shortness of breath in COPD patients

More information: Abstract 49885, Dyspnea As A Predictor Of All-Cause Mortality In Rural Bangladesh: A Population-Based Prospective Study, Scientific Abstract
Category: 01.20 - Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (EOH), G.R. Pesola1, M. Argos2, F. Parvez3, T. Islam4, A. Ahmed5, M. Rakibuzzaman5, H. Ahsan6; 1Columbia University - New York, NY/US, 2University of Chicago - Chicago/US, 3Columbia University - New York/US, 4University of Chicago in Bangaldesh - Dhaka/BD, 5University of Chicago in Bangladesh - Dhaka/US, 6University of Chicago - Chicago, IL/US

Related Stories

Comorbidities increase risk of mortality in COPD patients

May 4, 2012

Comorbidities are common among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and a number of these comorbidities are independently associated with an increased mortality risk, according to a new study.

Dyspnea during daily activities predicts all-cause mortality

February 21, 2014

Dyspnea, a sensation of breathlessness, during light daily activities can be used as an indicator of exercise intolerance and low fitness. According to a study on Finnish twins, persistent or developing dyspnea reveals an ...

Chest complaints more costly in obese patients

March 8, 2014

(HealthDay)—Higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased cost of care and longer hospital stays for patients who present to the emergency department with chest pain and dyspnea, according to research published ...

Recommended for you

Monkeys in Asia harbor virus from humans, other species

November 19, 2015

When it comes to spreading viruses, bats are thought to be among the worst. Now a new study of nearly 900 nonhuman primates in Bangladesh and Cambodia shows that macaques harbor more diverse astroviruses, which can cause ...

One-step test for hepatitis C virus infection developed

November 14, 2015

UC Irvine Health researchers have developed a cost-effective one-step test that screens, detects and confirms hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Dr. Ke-Qin Hu, director of hepatology services, will present findings at the ...

Computer model reveals deadly route of Ebola outbreak

November 10, 2015

Using a novel statistical model, a research team led by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health mapped the spread of the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, providing the most detailed picture to date ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.