Federal pain research database launched

May 28, 2014
Federal pain research database launched
The Interagency Pain Research Portfolio website. Users can search the database for information about federally funded pain research pojects.

The Interagency Pain Research Portfolio (IPRP), a database that provides information about pain research and training activities supported by the federal government, has been launched by six federal agencies.

Pain is a symptom of many disorders; can present as a disease in of itself. The economic cost of pain is estimated to be hundreds of billions of dollars annually in lost wages and productivity.

"This database will provide the public and the research community with an important tool to learn more about the breadth and details of pain research supported across the . They can search for individual research projects or sets of projects grouped by themes uniquely relevant to pain," said Linda Porter, Ph.D., Policy Advisor for Pain at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "It also can be helpful in identifying potential collaborators by searching for topic areas of interest or for investigators."

Users of the database easily can search over 1,200 research projects in a multi-tiered system. In Tier 1, grants are organized as basic, translational (research that can be applied to diseases), or clinical . In Tier 2, grants are sorted among 29 scientific topic areas related to pain, such as biobehavioral and psychosocial mechanisms, chronic overlapping conditions, and neurobiological mechanisms.

The Tier 2 categories are also organized into nine research themes: , basic to clinical, disparities, training and education, tools and instruments, risk factors and causes, surveillance and human trials, overlapping conditions, and use of services, treatments, and interventions.

The database was developed by NIH staff and members of the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC). The IPRCC is a federal advisory committee formed to increase understanding of pain and improve treatment strategies by expanding pain research efforts and encouraging collaboration across the government.

Four of the agencies that played a role in developing the IPRP are part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In addition to NIH, they are the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Food and Drug Administration. The other two agencies are the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense.

"The database reveals a diverse research portfolio in which contributions from and departments reflect their unique missions and the populations that they serve. For the first time, this information has been collected into a single database that can be mined to ensure that federal research efforts are not redundant and to identify opportunities to collaborate and share resources across agencies," said Dr. Porter. "In addition, it will help the federal entities that support research to identify gaps in research areas and trends in topic areas over time."

More information: To access the IPRP database, please visit: paindatabase.nih.gov

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