Financial insecurities hinder women from adhering to diabetes regimen

May 9, 2014 by Jared Wadley

(Medical Xpress)—Changes imposed by a diabetes regimen are considered unmanageable by financially insecure women, a new University of Michigan study indicates.

Study participants who were brought up with fewer resources were more likely to have family members who were diabetic when fewer treatment options were available, exposing them to the worst-case scenario. Women with more resources were aware of less severe cases and typically had more ties to the health care field.

"It became apparent that having previous knowledge about and the regimen, as well as having previous experiences viewing complications unfold among loved ones, shaped the experience of diagnosis and attitudes toward diabetes," said Emily Nicklett, U-M assistant professor of social work and the study's lead author.

Financially secure have greater access to self- and a more optimistic outlook than women who don't have the same financial security.

Nicklett, who published the research with colleague Sara Kuzminski Damiano of the University of Southern California, examined experiences among women with Type 2 diabetes in the Detroit area. Their ages ranged from 51 to 92. They were asked when they learned they had diabetes, their interaction with the doctor, their daily routine and their financial status. Results were based on surveys as well as semi-structured interviews.

Research participants recalled experiencing fear, depression or denial after being diagnosed with diabetes. Those with a more favorable financial situation tended to be more optimistic about their diagnosis: "I can handle it."

Knowledge and experience about diabetes prior to diagnosis could be partially responsible for this difference.

Explore further: Gestational diabetes tied to seven-fold increase in sleep apnea risk

More information: Emily Joy Nicklett and Sara Kuzminski Damiano. "Too little, too late: Socioeconomic disparities in the experience of women living with diabetes." Qualitative Social Work May 2014 13: 372-388, first published on February 3, 2014. DOI: 10.1177/1473325014522572

Related Stories

Women with diabetes less likely to have a mammogram

April 11, 2014

Women with diabetes are 14 per cent less likely to be screened for breast cancer compared to women without diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and Women's ...

Recommended for you

Engineered hot fat implants reduce weight gain in mice

August 20, 2015

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a novel way to engineer the growth and expansion of energy-burning "good" fat, and then found that this fat helped reduce weight gain and lower blood glucose ...

Bacteria may cause type 2 diabetes

June 1, 2015

Bacteria and viruses have an obvious role in causing infectious diseases, but microbes have also been identified as the surprising cause of other illnesses, including cervical cancer (Human papilloma virus) and stomach ulcers ...

Promising progress for new treatment of type 1 diabetes

July 30, 2015

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for treatment of type 1 diabetes. The study, published in the open access journal Scientific Reports, reveals that administration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.