Fla health workers test negative for MERS virus

May 15, 2014

The Florida Department of Health says all health care workers who came into contact with a Saudi resident infected with the second confirmed MERS case in the U.S. have tested negative for the rare virus.

Officials said in a statement Thursday that they are working closely with Orlando's Dr. P. Phillips Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to ensure appropriate care for the 44-year-old man. He remains hospitalized, but is improving.

FDH says there is no broad risk of MERS infection for the general public.

The patient with whom the workers came into contact arrived at Phillips on May 8. Three days earlier, the patient had visited Orlando Regional Medical Center.

MERS is a respiratory illness that begins with flu-like symptoms, but can lead to shortness of breath, pneumonia and death.

Explore further: US MERS patient still has fever

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