Men from ethnic minorities take longer to recover from mental illness, study finds

Men from ethnic minorities take longer to recover from mental illness, study finds

(Medical Xpress)—Men from ethnic minorities suffering from mental health problems in the UK can take longer to recover than white men as they are more reluctant to seek professional help, according to research at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Researchers at Royal Holloway have called for an active programme that promotes to black and minority ethnic (BME) men, as a disproportionate number, compared with , have been shown to come into contact with .

Speaking during Mental Health Awareness Week (Monday 12 May to Sunday 18 May), Dr Frank Keating, from the Department of Social Work at Royal Holloway, said: "Mental illness can have a devastating effect on people and their families, but sadly many men from black and ethnic minority communities can be hesitant to seek help.

"This can be for a number of reasons, including previous experiences with health professionals who have lacked cultural sensitivity, as well as the stigma attached to . The different social expectations of men among ethnic minority communities can also lead to them feeling pressurised into conforming to unrealistic ideals that can cause further stress."

The study, which analysed the experiences of twelve groups of men with poor mental health from African-Caribbean, African, Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Chinese communities in London and the West Midlands, found that BME men's ability to talk openly about feeling vulnerable was affected by masculine identity.

"These findings suggest that creating an environment of trust and cultural sensitivity are essential to enable BME men to talk about their mental health. For healthcare professionals, it's also vital to engage with the ideals that the men have of themselves and increase the patients' understanding of their own well-being in order to put them back in control," Dr Keating added.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Depression and mental health services usage

Sep 30, 2013

More than half the people in Ontario who reported they had major depression did not use physician-based mental health services in the following year, a new study has found.

Recommended for you

Family dinners reduce effects of cyberbullying in adolescents

1 hour ago

Sharing regular family meals with children may help protect them from the effects of cyberbullying, according to a study by McGill professor Frank Elgar, Institute for Health and Social Policy. Because family meal times represent ...

The Edwardians were also fans of brain training

7 hours ago

Brain-training programmes are all the rage. They are part of a growing digital brain-health industry that earned more than US$1 billion in revenue in 2012 and is estimated to reach US$6 billion by 2020. The extent to which they actually improve brain function re ...

Report advocates improved police training

Aug 29, 2014

A new report released yesterday by the Mental Health Commission of Canada identifies ways to improve the mental health training and education that police personnel receive.

User comments