Patients with AMD may not need monthly injections

Researchers have found that, contrary to prvious clinical trial findings, monthly injections to counteract age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may not be necessary. The research is being presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) this week in Orlando, Fla.

The investigators used a strategy called "treat and extend" to conduct the study, in which the frequency of office visits and injections were tailored to each patient's individual response to therapy. Following 185 patients over a three-and-a-half-year period, the average number of visits and injections was reduced from 12 to 8.3 times per year.

AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss among people 50 years of age or older in . The findings could reduce the burden associated with frequent therapy, lowering the financial burdens on patients, families and government.

More information: Abstract Title: Long-Term Visual Outcomes for a Treat and Extend Anti-VEGF Regimen in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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