In resting brains, researchers see signs of schizophrenia

May 5, 2014 by Bill Hathaway
In resting brains, Yale researchers see signs of schizophrenia
Colored areas highlight significant variations in activity of brains in people with schizophrenia not engaged in tasks when compared to control subjects. Credit: Yale University

(Medical Xpress)—In an advance that increases hopes of finding biological markers for schizophrenia, Yale researchers have discovered widespread disruption of signals while the brain is at rest in those suffering from the disabling neuropsychiatric disease.

The Yale team used fMRI scans and created a that simulates brain activity to discover the disruptions in global signaling—or patterns of while the brain is not involved in any particular task.

Previously, many researchers had thought that the overall brain activity at rest was mostly "background noise" and not clinically important, said Alan Anticevic, assistant professor in psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine and senior author of the study, reported online May 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"To our knowledge these results provide the first evidence that global whole-brain signals are altered in schizophrenia, calling into question the standard removal of this signal in clinical neuroimaging studies," Anticevic said.

These novel results have vital and broad implications for neuroimaging, as the search for neuropsychiatric biomarkers that could lead to early intervention and improved patient outcomes remains a prominent focus outlined by the National Institute of Mental Health.

Explore further: Study explores how brain disruption may foster schizophrenia

More information: "Altered global brain signal in schizophrenia," by Genevieve J. Yang et al. PNAS, 2014:

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4 / 5 (2) May 05, 2014
This is amazing news.
not rated yet May 06, 2014
This is amazing news.

It's not really a cure though.
1.3 / 5 (3) May 06, 2014
This is not science, but quack science
There is no evidence whatsoever that schizophrenia has biological basis
There is no straight evidence whatsoever about what even schizophrenia is
Like Prof. Szasz once said:
"If you talk to God you are a Good Christian, if God talks to you you are a schizophrenic"
Schizophrenia is probably a concept invented by the multinationals of pharma to sell more "cures"
It is a pity that this news" is listed as science

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