New technique to prevent anal sphincter lesions due to episiotomy during child delivery

May 19, 2014

New minimally invasive method provides the obstetrician, any time before child delivery, with the outline of the anal sphincter innervation so that episiotomy can be ruled out or planned and guided to minimize sphincter damage.

Results of a 10-year long multinational research project on Technologies for Anal Sphincter analysis and Incontinence (TASI) are available in: Corrado Cescon, Diego Riva , Vita Začesta, Kristina Drusany-Starič, Konstantinos Martsidis, Olexander Protsepko, Kaven Baessler, Roberto Merletti Effect of vaginal delivery on the external anal sphincter muscle innervation pattern evaluated by multichannel surface EMG: results of the multicentre study TASI-2 International Urogynecology Journal.

Episiotomy is a controversial surgical procedure performed during child delivery. It consists in an oblique cut of the perineum, tangential to the anal sphincter muscle, to facilitate birth and avoid spontaneous lacerations that are more difficult to suture. Its application ranges from 8% of vaginal births in Scandinavian Countries to 40-50% in Mediterranean countries, to 80-90% in Latin America and East European Countries. Depending on the innervation modality of the individual sphincter muscle, episiotomy might damage its innervation and weaken its voluntary control possibly resulting in fecal incontinence at later times. Preliminary knowledge of the individual sphincter innervation modality, made available by the technique developed at Politecnico di Torino, Italy, partially within a European Project, provides the obstetrician with the information needed to decide if and how episiotomy should be performed and evaluate the risks involved. The system has been tested on 250 women(82 receiving episiotomy) in 10 EU .

Explore further: OASIS risk up for nulliparous women with vacuum delivery

More information: DOI: 10.1007/s00192-014-2375-0

Related Stories

OASIS risk up for nulliparous women with vacuum delivery

August 24, 2012

(HealthDay)—For women whose infants are delivered by vacuum extraction, the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) is significantly higher among nulliparous women than multiparous women, according to a study published ...

Characteristics of episiotomy incision influence injury risk

March 20, 2012

(HealthDay) -- Narrow-angled episiotomies increase the risk of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), while other factors, including point of incision and episiotomy length and depth, reduce the risk of OASIS, according ...

Incidence of recurrent anal sphincter rupture is 7.1 percent

October 26, 2012

(HealthDay)—The incidence of recurrent anal sphincter rupture (ASR) is 7.1 percent, and several risk factors are associated with an increased risk, including excessive birth weight, vacuum extraction, and shoulder dystocia, ...

Long-term consequences of vaginal delivery

January 30, 2013

Women are more likely to experience urinary incontinence, prolapse and faecal incontinence 20 years after one vaginal delivery rather than one caesarean section, finds new research published in a thesis from Sahlgrenska Academy, ...

Recommended for you

Researchers discover rare flu-thwarting mutation

September 29, 2016

A rare and improbable mutation in a protein encoded by an influenza virus renders the virus defenseless against the body's immune system. This University of Rochester Medical Center discovery could provide a new strategy ...

Utah man may have contracted Zika from dying father's tears

September 29, 2016

A Utah man who mysteriously contracted Zika from his infected father may have got it by touching his dad's tears or sweat with his bare hands, according to new research unveiled Wednesday that found the unusual transmission ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.