WADA adds Xenon to list of banned substances

The World Anti-Doping Agency has added xenon gas to its list of banned substances after claims it can be used by athletes to help boost performance.

Scientific studies suggest that the gas artificially increases the levels of (EPO) in the blood, which is forbidden under WADA's rules.

In a statement Sunday, WADA said its executive committee approved the modification of its 2014 prohibited list to include xenon and the change should come into effect after a three-month notice period.

The WADA board also urged Spanish authorities to conclude the case of Operation Puerto as possible, saying the "lack of progress in the case was sending the wrong message to clean athletes right across the world"

3 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Anticipating the future of doping in sport

Mar 21, 2014

Doping in sport is nothing new. Ancient Greek athletes used stimulating potions to fortify themselves. Strychnine, caffeine, cocaine, and alcohol were regularly used by cyclists in the 19th century. Marathon ...

Neurosurgeon uses depth electrodes for speech mapping

May 15, 2014

At the 2014 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, neurosurgical researchers from University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center presented results from a small study looking at deep ...

Recommended for you

ER waiting times vary significantly, studies find

3 hours ago

(HealthDay)—When it comes to emergency room waiting times, patients seeking care at larger urban hospitals are likely to spend more time staring down the clock than those seen at smaller or more rural facilities, ...

Internists report considerable EMR-linked time loss

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Use of electronic medical record (EMR) systems is associated with considerable loss of free time per clinic day, according to a research letter published online Sept. 8 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Kids eat better if their parents went to college

4 hours ago

Children of college-educated parents eat more vegetables and drink less sugar, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia. But it's still not enough, the study goes on to say, as all kids are falling ...

User comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Chromodynamix
not rated yet May 20, 2014
Not 100% sure how Xenon works here, but any inert gas or a low partial pressure of Oxygen over a period of time will cause an increase in natural EPO. This is why athletes train at high altitudes or in low Oxygen environments.
Xenon is very expensive too!