World's most ancient woman could be 120-year-old Guatemalan

A Guatemalan woman who used to pick coffee and tend sheep—and who will turn 121 in November—could be the world's oldest by far, a national newspaper reported Tuesday.

Juana Chox Yac, who is an indigenous Kaqchikel Maya, was born November 29, 1893 in the of Santa Lucia Utatlan, Solola department, the report in the daily Siglo 21 said.

As a , she worked picking , and tending sheep and goats, before marrying at 15, the newspaper said.

Her first husband died nine years after they were married and their two children have died as well.

Chox Yac however remarried at 29 and had seven more children before being widowed again in 1964.

She has a family of 75 relatives including children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren, said the report, which published a government document with her birth date.

It was not immediately known if her details have been submitted to the Guinness Book of World Records for verification.

But the report puts her age at four years older than Japan's Misao Okawa, who turned 116 on March 5 and is the book's official record holder for longest-lived woman.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

World's oldest woman turns 115 in Japan

Mar 05, 2013

The world's oldest woman celebrated her 115th birthday on Tuesday in a Japanese nursing home with her favourite mackerel sushi dish on the menu.

Recommended for you

England's NHS appeals for more government funds

12 minutes ago

Leaders of England's state-funded National Health Service (NHS) warned on Thursday that billions of pounds in extra funds were needed to maintain patient care, laying down the gauntlet to politicians ahead of May's general ...

Lose the weight, not the potatoes

1 hour ago

A new study demonstrates that people can eat potatoes and still lose weight." Potatoes, Glycemic Index, and Weight Loss in Free-Living Individuals: Practical Implications" is now available through free access from the Journal of ...

Team-based approach can improve hypertension control

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—A team-based approach using evidence-based principles can be incorporated into practice workflow to improve hypertension control, according to a practice story published by the American Medical ...

User comments