Alcohol use increases over generation in study of moms, daughters in Australia

Credit: Kevin Casper/public domain

Drinking alcohol has increased over a generation in a study of mothers and daughters in Australia.

Previous research suggests drinking patterns have changed with more at younger ages.

The authors compared change in alcohol use over a generation of young women born in Australia born from 1981 to 1983 with that of their at the same age. Data from an Australian birth were used for the two generations of women. The study included 1,053 mothers and daughters with complete data after 21 years of follow-up.

The daughters had greater odds of consuming high and moderate levels of alcohol than their mothers. Daughters between the ages of 18 and 25 had more than five times the odds of consuming the highest level of alcohol (more than 30 glasses of alcohol per month) and nearly three times the odds of consuming between seven and 30 glasses per month. Not having a dependent child roughly doubled the odds of all levels of drinking in both mothers and daughters. Having a partner doubled the odds of consuming high levels of alcohol while the odds of drinking at the highest levels were more than five times for mothers who were single. Higher education had no effect on consumption.

"In summary, this study provides strong evidence for a large increase in young female drinking during recent decades, as reflected in the drinking of mothers and their female offspring in their early 20s. International research is urgently needed to confirm what we suspect is a trend, which may have been underestimated in many Western countries. It may be time for more aggressive antialcohol programs aimed at ." Rosa Alati, Ph.D., M.Appl.Sc., of the University of Queensland, Australia, and colleagues wrote in thier JAMA Psychiatry article.

More information: JAMA Psychiatry. Published online June 25, 2014. DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.513

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Over 45s drink more frequently than young women

Jun 03, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—They don't tend to binge drink but middle-aged women over 45 consume alcohol more frequently than any other age group, a behaviour putting their long-term health at risk, according to QUT ...

Study finds risky drinking improves 'social status'

Jun 25, 2014

Young adults of both sexes are more likely to engage in riskier patterns of drinking alcohol as part of gaining a better social status among their peers—and health authorities need to consider these factors ...

One in ten women drink a little alcohol while pregnant

Oct 15, 2013

Researchers in Norway found that negative affectivity is linked to light alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy. Results published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federa ...

Recommended for you

Suicide risk falls substantially after talk therapy

4 hours ago

Repeat suicide attempts and deaths by suicide were roughly 25 percent lower among a group of Danish people who underwent voluntary short-term psychosocial counseling after a suicide attempt, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School ...

Brains transform remote threats into anxiety

Nov 21, 2014

Modern life can feel defined by low-level anxiety swirling through society. Continual reports about terrorism and war. A struggle to stay on top of family finances and hold onto jobs. An onslaught of news ...

Mental disorders due to permanent stress

Nov 21, 2014

Activated through permanent stress, immune cells will have a damaging effect on and cause changes to the brain. This may result in mental disorders. The effects of permanent stress on the immune system are studied by the ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.