Excessive drinking causes one in ten adult deaths, CDC reports

Excessive alcohol consumption causes one in 10 deaths among US adults, whether because of accidents or medical conditions that arise from long-term drinking, research showed Thursday.

Each year, alcohol-related deaths cost the US economy $224 billion, mainly in lost productivity, said a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease said 10 percent of deaths of people aged 20-64—a total of 88,000 deaths per year—are linked to excessive alcohol.

"These deaths were due to health effects from drinking too much over time, such as breast cancer, liver disease, and heart disease," said the study.

Others were "from drinking too much in a short period of time, such as violence, alcohol poisoning, and ."

Men were more likely to die from alcohol than women, with 70 percent of the drinking deaths occurring among men.

Drinking too much is defined differently for men and women, according to the CDC.

Binge dinking is considered four or more drinks at an occasion for women, and five or more for men.

Heavy drinking is considered eight or more drinks per week for women, and 15 or more drinks a week for men.

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Returners
1 / 5 (1) Jun 26, 2014
Queue ten people who miss the point saying, "Drink Responsibly," knowing the 1 in 10 are those who can't help it anyway because they're addicted, because every time they try to quit it gets promoted back to them on their favorite sports channel on commercial breaks, and of course the beer and liquor section is the largest section in any grocery store or convenience store.

Ahhhh, but let's legalize recreational Marijuana on top of the already abused, or just plain deadly recreational drugs. After all, beer still doesn't come with a label on it that says, "AFT/Surgeon General's Warning: Bing drinking can kill you and your loved ones, and perfect strangers. Heavy drinking destroys brain, liver, and heart cells."

Maybe we could make a law that says everyone has to watch drunk driving videos and liver disease videos at the point of sale if they want to buy alcohol.

Keep up the good work, telling us what has been known for decades already, but ignored by policy makers.
bearly
not rated yet Jun 27, 2014
So 1 in 10 Americans die from alcohol related conditions but it is still legal?
Marijuana doesn't kill anyone but it is illegal?
Criminals and lunatics kill people using guns but they have "rights" and "protections" while the innocent gun is vilified?
Anyone notice a pattern of failed policies?