FDA approves new nail fungus treatment

FDA approves new nail fungus treatment

(HealthDay)—A new topical nail fungus treatment, Jublia, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Jublia (efinaconazole) is made by the Canadian company Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc., the Associated Press reported Wednesday.

Jublia comes in liquid form and is applied directly to the nail. According to Valeant, FDA approval was based on two studies involving more than 1,600 people with onychomycosis. The findings were published last year in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. Cure rates were about 18 percent for the patients involved in one study, and about 15 percent for those involved in the other.

In a statement, Valeant said it plans to begin marketing Jublia late in 2014.

More information: Health Highlights: June 11, 2014

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carllvsports
not rated yet Aug 09, 2014
Very interesting! I hope this approach can be rolled out into market as soon as possible, and then I'll give it a shot. I have tried tons of ways to deal with this infection, but none of them seemed really effective for me. Vinegar, tea oil, oral medications can only ease the symptoms, but was never able to kill the bacteria. I'm considering taking a laser treatment, but I'm not sure about the real effect. I got some information from here: http://lasernail therapy.com. Is there anyone who had this kind of treatment before? Thanks for advice.