Guam sees outbreak of pink eye

June 6, 2014

An outbreak of pink eye in Guam has affected hundreds on the U.S. territory.

Guam health officials say 248 people have contracted conjunctivitis—also known as —since early May. Pacific Daily News (http://is.gd/fsKLUy) says the outbreak continues.

Conjunctivitis is a common eye condition and can be highly contagious.

In April, in the U.S. territory of American Samoa were closed for 10 days after a pink eye outbreak affected some 3,000 students and teachers. The outbreak prompted the closure of 28 schools on the territory's main island of Tutuila.

Explore further: Japan's runaway penguin suffering from pink-eye

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