Journal Maturitas publishes position statement on management of uterine fibroids

June 16, 2014

Journal Maturitas today announced the publication of a position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) on the topic of the management of uterine fibroids.

Uterine fibroids (also termed leiomyomas or myomas) are the most common tumors of the . While they may be asymptomatic they can cause abnormal bleeding, pelvic pressure symptoms and infertility. Fibroid growth and regression vary throughout life. Thus, they tend to grow during the reproductive years and regress after the menopause. They affect millions of women and are the leading cause of hysterectomy.

The traditional management of symptomatic fibroids has been surgery (hysterectomy or myomectomy). However, some women do not want invasive surgery and wish to retain their uterus and fertility. Fortunately, during the last few years new medical and surgical uterine-conserving alternatives have become available as technological advances have been made. The range of medical treatments allows flexible management of fibroid-related symptoms; the options include tranexamic acid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, contraceptive steroids, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues, antiprogesterone, and selective progesterone receptor modulators. Alternatives to surgery include uterine artery embolization, myolysis and ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound (guided with or ultrasound). The choice of treatment depends on fibroid size, the underlying symptoms and their severity and the woman's desire for subsequent fertility and pregnancy, as well as efficacy and need for repeated interventions.

These and other recommendations presented in EMAS' position statement are published in the article, "EMAS Position statement: Management of " by, Faustino R. Pérez-López, Lía Ornat, Iuliana Ceausu, Herman Depypere, C. Tamer Erel, Irene Lambrinoudaki, Karin Schenck-Gustafsson, Tommaso Simoncini, Florence Tremollieres and Margaret Rees.

More information: "EMAS Position statement: Management of uterine fibroids" by, Faustino R. Pérez-López, Lía Ornat, Iuliana Ceausu, Herman Depypere, C. Tamer Erel, Irene Lambrinoudaki, Karin Schenck-Gustafsson, Tommaso Simoncini, Florence Tremollieres and Margaret Rees. www.maturitas.org/article/S0378-5122(14)00198-4/abstract

Related Stories

Genetic risk for uterine fibroids discovered

October 4, 2012

Uterine fibroids are the most common type of pelvic tumors in women and are the leading cause of hysterectomy in the United States. Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) are the first to discover a genetic risk ...

Fibroids are common problem for women

April 1, 2014

Uterine fibroids are very common, occurring in as many as 50 percent of women in their reproductive years and up to two-thirds of women by the time they go through menopause. While many fibroids cause no problems and require ...

Recommended for you

Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies

July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. ...

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.