Patients' perceived lifetime risk for CVD often inaccurate

Patients' perceived lifetime risk for CVD often inaccurate

(HealthDay)—Patients' frequently have a misperception of lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in the July issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Elisabeth Joye Petr, M.D., from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and colleagues examined the perception of lifetime CVD risk in 2,998 participants from the Dallas Heart Study. The for developing CVD was classified as high (≥39 percent) versus low (<39 percent) according to risk factor burden detailed in a previously published algorithm. A five-point scale was used to assess perception of lifetime risk for myocardial infarction.

The researchers found that 64.8 percent of participants were classified as having high predicted lifetime CVD risk. Family history of premature myocardial infarction, high self-reported stress, and low perceived health all correlated strongly with high perceived lifetime risk (odds ratios, 2.37, 2.17, and 2.71, respectively), after multivariate adjustment. A more modest association was observed for traditional CVD risk factors and high perceived lifetime risk.

"Misperception of lifetime risk for CVD is common and frequently reflects the influence of factors other than traditional risk factor levels," the authors write. "These findings highlight the importance of effectively communicating the significance of traditional risk factors in determining the lifetime risk for CVD."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Healthy living adds 14 years to your life

Nov 05, 2012

If you have optimal heart health in middle age, you may live up to 14 years longer, free of cardiovascular disease, than your peers who have two or more cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, according to a new Northwestern ...

Recommended for you

ASHG: MI without substantial CAD is minimally heritable

Oct 21, 2014

(HealthDay)—The presence of myocardial infarction (MI) without substantial coronary artery disease (CAD) is not familial, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of ...

New treatment for inherited cholesterol

Oct 21, 2014

At the London Olympics in 2012, South African swimmer Cameron van den Burgh dedicated his world record-breaking win in the 100m breast stroke to one of his biggest rivals and closest friends, Alexander Dale ...

User comments