Redo high intensity focused U/S may up urinary symptoms

June 5, 2014
Redo high intensity focused U/S may up urinary symptoms

(HealthDay)—For men with prostate cancer, retreatment with high intensity focused ultrasound is associated with an increase in urinary, but not sexual, side effects, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

Viktor Berge, M.D., Ph.D., from Oslo University Hospital, and colleagues used United Kingdom registry data on high intensity focused to examine morbidity after primary and redo treatments. Participants included 359 patients who received one whole gland high intensity focused ultrasound treatment for localized , of whom 36.2 percent received retreatment. Patients were followed for a median of 27 months after retreatment. Validated questionnaires were administered before and after ultrasound treatment.

The researchers found that 10.8 and 3.9 percent of patients experienced after the first treatment and retreatment, respectively (P = 0.009). Urethral dilatation was required in 13.8 and 14.0 percent of patients after first and redo ultrasound treatments, respectively (P = 0.7), while bladder neck incision was required in 9.2 and 11.6 percent, respectively (P = 0.2). No leak was reported by 73.3 and 55.1 percent of patients, respectively, before and after retreatment (P < 0.001), and 2.7 and 9.0 percent, respectively, used daily pads (P = 0.07). In analysis of erectile function, no difference was seen in the proportion of who were potent before and after retreatment (56.2 and 56.0 percent, respectively; P = 0.9).

"Redo focused ultrasound is associated with an increase in urinary side effects but sexual side effects do not appear to be significantly increased," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to SonaCare Medical.

More information: Abstract
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