US clears robotic legs for some paralyzed people

June 26, 2014

U.S. health regulators have approved a first-of-a-kind set of robotic leg braces that can help some disabled people walk again.

The ReWalk system functions like an exoskeleton for people paralyzed from the waist down, allowing them to stand and walk with assistance from a caretaker.

The device consists of leg braces with and motorized joints that respond to subtle changes in upper-body movement and shifts in balance. A harness around the patient's waist and shoulders keeps the suit in place, and a backpack holds the computer and . Crutches are used for stability.

ReWalk is intended for people who are disabled due to certain spinal cord injuries.

The device was developed by the founder of Israel-based Argo Medical Technologies, who was paralyzed in a 1997 car crash.

Explore further: An exoskeleton of advanced design promises a new degree of independence for people with paraplegia (w/ Video)

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