App for headache sufferers shows success

July 29, 2014

A unique app that helps headache sufferers to record the severity and regularity of their pain is being used as part of a Griffith research study.

A new approach to the treatment of headaches, the ENHANCE project looks at coping with their triggers and is being led by Professor Paul Martin from Griffith Health Institute's Behaviorial Basis of Health program.

He has developed an approach designed to enable people to cope with the triggers of their headaches called Learning to Cope with Triggers (LCT).

Using a combination of (CBT) and LCT, the team is aiming to help headache sufferers to become desensitised to triggers such as food, noise, stress etc, or build up a tolerance to them.

Now, the team, in conjunction with Wexpert Technologies, have developed a unique electronic headache diary which can be used by participants in the study in order to record daily ratings of head pain.

"Information recorded via the can be directly downloaded into data files, saving time and eliminating transcription errors," says Professor Martin. "The technology will enable the team to know when the ratings of head pain are made, rather than relying on the self reports of the participants. This app will benefit the ENHANCE project but will also be a very useful tool for other researchers around the world."

The new app can be used on all smartphone platforms as well as on any form of computer.

Professor Martin says that current participants in the study have reported that the app is 'user friendly,' 'much easier to use than paper and pencil' and 'a convenient solution'.

Explore further: New mobile app helps migraine sufferers track and analyze pain

Related Stories

Migraine attacks increase following stress 'let-down'

March 26, 2014

Migraine sufferers who experienced reduced stress from one day to the next are at significantly increased risk of migraine onset on the subsequent day, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Montefiore Headache ...

Migraine attacks increase following stress

May 5, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—Migraine sufferers who experienced reduced stress from one day to the next are at significantly increased risk of migraine onset on the subsequent day, according to a new study conducted by researchers ...

Recommended for you

Bile acid uptake inhibitor prevents NASH / fatty liver in mice

September 21, 2016

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of ...

New therapeutic target for Crohn's disease

September 20, 2016

Research from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) identifies a promising new target for future drugs to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, published today in Cell Reports, also indicates ...

Mosquitoes, Zika and biotech regulation

September 19, 2016

In a new Policy Forum article in Science, NC State professor Jennifer Kuzma argues that federal authorities are missing an opportunity to revise outdated regulatory processes not fit for modern innovations in biotechnology, ...

Arthritis drug may help with type of hair loss

September 22, 2016

(HealthDay)—For people who suffer from a condition that causes disfiguring hair loss, a drug used for rheumatoid arthritis might regrow their hair, a new, small study suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.