China lifts quarantine after man dies of plague

July 24, 2014

(AP)—A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man died of bubonic plague has been lifted, China's official news agency reported Thursday.

A total of 151 people were under observation in the city of Yumen in Gansu province after authorities determined they had come in contact with a man who died of the plague July 16, the Xinhua News Agency reported. It said none of them had reported symptoms of the disease.

Investigators believe the 38-year-old man contracted the after contact with a marmot, Xinhua said. During the quarantine, authorities in the city of about 180,000 carried out disinfection and rat extermination, according to Xinhua.

Bubonic plague killed millions of people in Europe in the 14th century and tens of thousands in China in the 19th century. It remains endemic in northwest China and is spread largely through flea bites. The bacteria can cause gangrene, seizures and fever.

Explore further: Boy dies of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan

Related Stories

Boy dies of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan

August 26, 2013

A teenage boy has died of bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan, the country's health officials confirmed Monday, adding that an epidemic was not likely.

Bubonic plague claims 32 lives in Madagascar (Update)

December 20, 2013

Bubonic plague, which wiped out a third of Europe's population in the Middle Ages, has reared its ugly head in the African island state of Madagascar where 32 people have died in a fresh outbreak of the so-called Black Death ...

Recommended for you

Gut environment could reduce severity of malaria

February 8, 2016

Microorganisms in the gut could play a role in reducing the severity of malaria, according to a new study co-authored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and the University of Louisville.

Easier diagnosis for fungal infection of the lungs

January 18, 2016

A new clinical imaging method developed in collaboration with a University of Exeter academic may enable doctors to tackle one of the main killers of patients with weakened immune systems sooner and more effectively.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.