US Concussion expert: World Cup sets bad example

by Jimmy Golen
Germany's Christoph Kramer gets assistance during the World Cup final soccer match between Germany and Argentina at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, July 13, 2014. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

Concussion expert Chris Nowinski says World Cup organizers missed a chance to use the tournament to teach football fans and young players around the globe about the dangers of head injuries.

Several times in the event players sustained obvious concussions but continued to play—a practice doctors agree can put them at risk of severe brain damage. In the final, Germany midfielder Christoph Kramer continued playing after colliding with Argentina defender Ezequiel Garay. Kramer later had to be helped off the field and said he couldn't remember much from the collision.

Nowinski says he doesn't just worry about the top professionals who are injured in the . He's also concerned about the millions who are watching and might think it's OK to keep playing after a concussion.

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