Large variation in lipid reduction with high-dose statin tx

Large variation in lipid reduction with high-dose statin tx
There is considerable interindividual variation in the magnitude of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B reductions achieved with statin therapy, which affects cardiovascular disease risk, according to a study published in the August 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

(HealthDay)—There is considerable interindividual variation in the magnitude of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), and apolipoprotein B (apoB) reductions achieved with statin therapy, which affects cardiovascular disease risk, according to a study published in the August 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

S. Matthijs Boekholdt, M.D., Ph.D., from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis using individual patient data from eight randomized controlled statin trials. Data were included for 38,153 patients who were allocated to , and underwent assessment for conventional lipids and apolipoproteins at baseline and at one-year follow-up.

The researchers found that 5,287 participants had 6,286 major cardiovascular events during follow-up. Reductions of LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and apoB were subject to large interindividual variability despite a fixed statin dose. More than 40 percent of those assigned to high-dose statins did not achieve an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL. The adjusted hazard ratios for major cardiovascular events were 0.56, 0.51, and 0.44, respectively, for those who reached an LDL-C of 75 to <100 mg/dL, 50 to <75 mg/dL, and <50 mg/dL versus LDL-C >175 mg/dL. The findings were similar for non-HDL-C and apoB.

"Patients who achieve very low LDL-C levels have a lower risk for major cardiovascular events than do those achieving moderately low levels," conclude the authors.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Niacin too dangerous for routine cholesterol therapy

Jul 16, 2014

After 50 years of being a mainstay cholesterol therapy, niacin should no longer be prescribed for most patients due to potential increased risk of death, dangerous side effects and no benefit in reducing heart attacks and ...

Recommended for you

Vitamin K antagonist plus clopidogrel feasible for PCI

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) combined with clopidogrel may be a better alternative to triple anticoagulant therapy in patients on long-term VKA undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) ...

How pneumonia bacteria can compromise heart health

Sep 19, 2014

Bacterial pneumonia in adults carries an elevated risk for adverse cardiac events (such as heart failure, arrhythmias, and heart attacks) that contribute substantially to mortality—but how the heart is ...

An autoimmune response may contribute to hypertension

Sep 17, 2014

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack, stroke, chronic heart failure, and kidney disease. Inflammation is thought to promote the development of high blood pressure, though it is not clear what triggers ...

User comments