Personal View looks back on 40 years of the Glasgow Coma Scale

A group of leading brain injury specialists look back on 40 years of the Glasgow Coma Scale and outline the continuing role of the scale in research and clinical practice, in a new Personal View published in The Lancet Neurology.

The Personal View is published on the 40th anniversary of the Glasgow Coma Scale's introduction in a 1974 Lancet article*. Since this seminal publication, the Glasgow Coma Scale has provided a practical method for bedside assessment of impairment of conscious level, the clinical hallmark of acute . The scale was designed to be easy to use in in general and specialist units and to replace previous ill-defined and inconsistent methods. 40 years later, the Glasgow Coma Scale has become an integral part of clinical practice and research worldwide.

The paper's lead author is Professor Graham Teasdale, of the University of Glasgow, UK, one of the authors of the original paper introducing the scale. Professor Teasdale and colleagues examine the extent to which the original aspirations of the authors have been fulfilled, address some myths and misapprehensions about the scale, examine criticisms, and outline the continuing role of the scale in research and clinical practice.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
A Lancet Neurology podcast interview with Professor Teasdal. Credit: Lancet


More information: * ASSESSMENT OF COMA AND IMPAIRED CONSCIOUSNESS: A Practical Scale by Graham Teasdale and Bryan Jennett The Lancet, Volume 304, Issue 7872, Pages 81 - 84, 13 July 1974

www.thelancet.com/journals/lan… (14)70120-6/fulltext

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

'Microlesions' in epilepsy discovered by novel technique

Dec 16, 2014

Using an innovative technique combining genetic analysis and mathematical modeling with some basic sleuthing, researchers have identified previously undescribed microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic ...

Thumbs-up for mind-controlled robotic arm (w/ Video)

Dec 16, 2014

A paralysed woman who controlled a robotic arm using just her thoughts has taken another step towards restoring her natural movements by controlling the arm with a range of complex hand movements.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.