Physician continuity is key after ER visit for heart failure

Physician continuity is key after ER visit for heart failure

(HealthDay)—Heart failure patients who follow up with a familiar physician after release from the emergency department have better outcomes, according to research published online July 9 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Heart Failure.

Robinder S. Sidhu, M.D., of the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues assessed the effect of physician continuity on for a retrospective cohort of 12,285 patients (mean age, 74.9 years) who were treated and released from the with a first-time diagnosis of .

The researchers found that receiving follow-up from a familiar versus unfamiliar physician after discharge from the emergency department were less likely to experience hospitalization or death at three months (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.79; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.71 to 0.89), at six months (aHR, 0.86; 95 percent CI, 0.77 to 0.95), and at 12 months (aHR, 0.87; 95 percent CI, 0.80 to 0.96). Follow-up care with any physician within 30 days of discharge from the emergency department was associated with reduced risk of repeat emergency department visit or death at six months.

"The crux of the matter is the following: are patients who see a familiar physician better off simply because of the familiarity, or is there something different about patients who see a familiar physician compared with patients who do not?" writes the author of an accompanying editorial.

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Clopidogrel after MI less effective in diabetes patients

Sep 05, 2012

(HealthDay)—Clopidogrel therapy following a heart attack does less to reduce the risk of death in patients with diabetes than in those without diabetes, according to a study published in the Sept. 5 issue ...

Recommended for you

Poor response to cholesterol drugs may indicate blocked arteries

6 hours ago

If your "bad" cholesterol level stays the same or increases after you take statin drugs, you may have more blocked arteries than people whose levels drop, according to research in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Th ...

Review: more whole grains, less coronary heart disease

Feb 25, 2015

(HealthDay)—Higher dietary intake of whole grains may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a meta-analysis published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Shining new light on vascular diseases in diabetics

Feb 25, 2015

Approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States alone are suffering from peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common vascular problem that is caused by narrowing of the arteries as a result of plaque ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.