Study: Psych drug ER trips approach 90,000 a year

A new study says bad reactions to psychiatric drugs result in nearly 90,000 emergency room visits each year by U.S. adults.

A drug used in some popular sleeping pills is among the common culprits.

Most of the ER visits involve troublesome side effects or accidental overdoses and almost one in five results in hospitalization.

That's according to an analysis of 2009-2011 data that the study authors analyzed.

They say doctors can help by recommending that patients use other insomnia treatments first, including better sleep habits and behavior therapy.

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