New radiological signs of gastric lap band slippage identified

Researchers in Ohio and Rhode Island have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands. Adding widespread knowledge of the new signs—inferior displacement of the superolateral band margin by more than 2.4 cm from the diaphragm and the presence of an air-fluid level above the band on a frontal radiograph—to radiologists' knowledge base will aid them in diagnosing affected bariatric patients.

These signs of serious complications are evident on upright frontal scout radiographs, enabling radiologists familiar with the signs to accurately diagnose slippage from chest or abdominal radiography alone, rather than the more time-consuming barium swallow.

"The indication in…publications within the past decade that a normal gastric band should project 4-5 cm below the diaphragm is confusing and potentially misleading given that the modern pars flaccida surgical technique intentionally places the band at or within 2 cm of the esophagogastric junction," the researchers say in "Gastric Band Slippage: A Case-Controlled Study Comparing New and Old Radiographic Signs of This Important Surgical Complication," published in the July 2014 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Problems with a gastric band

Dec 21, 2011

As the number of people having gastric bands fitted to lose weight increases, so will the number of complications associated with the procedure. A Case Report published Online First by the Lancet details the problems experi ...

Recommended for you

Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

Nov 25, 2014

Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.

Mexican boy who had massive tumor recovering

Nov 25, 2014

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had pieces of a massive tumor removed and who drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in the southwestern U.S. state of New Mexico is still recovering after ...

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.