Eating baked or broiled fish weekly boosts brain health, study says

brain

Eating baked or broiled fish once a week is good for the brain, regardless of how much omega-3 fatty acid it contains, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The findings, published online recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, add to growing evidence that lifestyle factors contribute to brain health later in life.

Scientists estimate that more than 80 million people will have dementia by 2040, which could become a substantial burden to families and drive up , noted senior investigator James T. Becker, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry, Pitt School of Medicine. Some studies have predicted that lifestyle changes such as a reduction in rates of physical inactivity, smoking and obesity could lead to fewer cases of Alzheimer's disease and other conditions of cognitive impairment in the elderly. The anti-oxidant effect of , which are found in high amounts in fish, seeds and nuts, and certain oils, also have been associated with improved health, particularly health.

"Our study shows that people who ate a diet that included baked or broiled, but not fried, fish have larger brain volumes in regions associated with memory and cognition," Dr. Becker said. "We did not find a relationship between omega-3 levels and these brain changes, which surprised us a little. It led us to conclude that we were tapping into a more general set of lifestyle factors that were affecting brain health of which diet is just one part."

Lead investigator Cyrus Raji, M.D., Ph.D., who now is in radiology residency training at UCLA, and the research team analyzed data from 260 people who provided information on their dietary intake, had high-resolution brain MRI scans, and were cognitively normal at two time points during their participation in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), a 10-year multicenter effort that began in 1989 to identify risk factors for heart disease in people over 65.

"The subset of CHS participants answered questionnaires about their eating habits, such as how much fish did they eat and how was it prepared," Dr. Raji said. "Baked or broiled fish contains higher levels of omega-3s than fried fish because the fatty acids are destroyed in the high heat of frying, so we took that into consideration when we examined their brain scans."

People who ate baked or broiled fish at least once a week had greater grey matter brain volumes in areas of the brain responsible for memory (4.3 percent) and cognition (14 percent) and were more likely to have a college education than those who didn't eat fish regularly, the researchers found. But no association was found between the brain differences and blood levels of omega-3s.

"This suggests that lifestyle factors, in this case eating fish, rather than biological factors contribute to structural changes in the brain," Dr. Becker noted. "A confluence of likely are responsible for better , and this reserve might prevent or delay cognitive problems that can develop later in life."

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alfie_null
5 / 5 (3) Aug 05, 2014
For omega-3, sushi would be the best way to eat fish?
Sinister1812
not rated yet Aug 05, 2014
Do omega 3 supplements have the same effect?
JVK
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 05, 2014
http://www.ncbi.n...23206328 A quantum theory for the irreplaceable role of docosahexaenoic acid in neural cell signalling throughout evolution

Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model
http://www.ncbi.n...3960065/

Does anyone else understand nutritional epigenetics at the level of quantum physics and chemistry that links the epigenetic landscape to the physical landscape of DNA in the organized genomes of species from microbes to man via biophysically-constrained conserved molecular mechanisms?

If not, is the problem because everyone else was taught to believe in the pseudoscientific nonsense of mutation-initiated natural selection and the evolution of biodiversity, when biodiversity is obviously nutrient-dependent and controlled by the physiology of reproduction?

Did anyone ever ask whoever taught them about evolution: Is there a model for that, or a model organism that exemplifies the change into another species?
animah
5 / 5 (1) Aug 06, 2014
Says JVK - James V Kohl, purveyor of sex paraphernalia, thus great peddler of Sin and the destruction of Christian morality.

In any case your product, "scent of Eros" is snake oil and cannot possibly work. As Rob van den Hurk (a pheromone specialist) noted, pheromones work "in concentrations of nanograms to picograms. When administered in higher concentrations, pheromones often result in no or a repulsive behavioral effect. "

This kind of concentration is not consistently achievable in a consumer product. A user is also likely to over-apply. So At best it has no effect, and there is a good chance it is actually repulsive to women.

So for you to pretend science supports your self-serving commercial aims is beyond the pale.
JVK
1 / 5 (1) Aug 06, 2014
The anonymous "animah" has posted this same comment on several different discussion threads. The intent is to limit discussion to the invented theories about evolution. No attempt is made to address the facts included in my published works with details about cell type differentiation.

Obviously, there are many people too afraid that the facts will eliminate evolutionary theory from any further consideration whatsoever. But that's what happens when people begin to look at what they accepted because they were taught to believe in, and accepted it as if it ever was anything more than pseudoscientific nonsense.

It never was, and evolutionary theory never will be more than the invention of population geneticists and their idiot minions.

See: Replace the Modern Synthesis (Neo-Darwinism): An Interview With Denis Noble
http://www.huffin...211.html

"[W]hat Haldane, Fisher, Sewell Wright, Hardy, Weinberg et al. did was invent...."