Extra time spent counseling, coordinating care billable

August 14, 2014
Extra time spent counseling, coordinating care billable

(HealthDay)—Extra time spent counseling patients and coordinating care can be billed using evaluation and management (E/M) and prolonged service codes, according to an article published July 24 in Medical Economics.

In order to successfully bill for extra time spent with patients, the following must be well documented: (1) estimated total time of the visit; (2) time or percent of the visit spent in counseling/coordination of care; and (3) the nature of the counseling/coordination of care (e.g., changes in the patient's , , referrals, and new medications or testing).

According to Medical Economics, prolonged service codes are another tool to use in billing for extra time, but at least one hour of face-to-face patient contact beyond the usual or average E/M service must have been spent. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) billing codes exist for direct face-to-face patient contact in the office or outpatient setting when billed on the same day as the companion E/M service (CPT code 99354) as well as for each additional 30 minutes following the first hour of prolonged service (99355). Prolonged service can also be billed in the inpatient or observation setting (first hour, 99356, and each additional 30 minutes, 99357).

Finally, according to the article, providers should "clearly differentiate in the documentation the amount of time spent on counseling or monitoring separately from the total length of the service."

Explore further: New study suggests using sedentary behavior counseling in primary care

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Beyond the sweetness of sugar

June 24, 2016

We all know the nutritional "evils" of sugar as a potential cause of obesity, chronic disease and death, through to being a potentially brain damaging substance.

Is 'when we eat' as important as 'what we eat'?

June 21, 2016

In a review of research on the effect of meal patterns on health, the few studies available suggest that eating irregularly is linked to a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and obesity). ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.