Role of innervation explored in gastric tumorigenesis

Role of innervation explored in gastric tumorigenesis

(HealthDay)—Vagal innervation is involved in gastric tumorigenesis, according to an experimental study published in the Aug. 20 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

Chun-Mei Zhao, Ph.D., from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, and colleagues examined the role of innervation in gastric tumorigenesis using mouse models.

The researchers found that surgical or pharmacological denervation of the stomach correlated with a marked reduction in and progression in three separate mouse models of , but only in the denervated portion of the stomach. The therapeutic effects of systemic chemotherapy were enhanced by vagotomy or botulinum toxin type A treatment, which also prolonged survival. Inhibition of Wnt-signaling and suppression of stem cell expansion were seen in association with denervation-induced suppression of tumorigenesis. In gastric organoid cultures, growth was stimulated by neurons in a Wnt-mediated manner via cholinergic signaling. Gastric tumorigenesis was suppressed by pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the muscarinic acetylcholine M3 receptor. Tumor stage correlated with neural density and activated Wnt signaling in gastric cancer patients, while the risk of gastric cancer was reduced with vagotomy.

"Together, our findings suggest that vagal innervation contributes to gastric tumorigenesis via M3 receptor-mediated Wnt signaling in the stem cells, and that denervation might represent a feasible strategy for the control of gastric cancer," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Primary driver of stomach cancer development identified

Apr 23, 2008

In a discovery that could lead to the development of new treatments for gastric cancer, scientists at the Melbourne Branch of the international Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) have discovered what appears to be ...

Recommended for you

Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers

Nov 21, 2014

New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases was presented today by Dr Anna Sophie Berghoff at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

New model of follow up for breast cancer patients

Nov 21, 2014

Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.