American College of Emergency Physicians

The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) is the oldest and largest national medical specialty organization representing physicians who practice emergency medicine. With more than 32,000 members, ACEP is the leading continuing education source for emergency physicians and the primary information resource on developments in the specialty. Founded in 1968, ACEP achieved a major milestone in 1979 when emergency medicine was recognized as the nation's 23rd medical specialty by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS). The independent certifying body for the specialty, the American Board of Emergency Medicine was installed at that time as a member of the ABMS. The College continually monitors trends in the health care environment and analyzes issues affecting emergency physicians and their patients.

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The boy who cried wolf: Drug alerts in the ER

To prevent a single adverse drug event, one commercial electronic health record opioid warning system fired off 123 unnecessary and clinically inconsequential alerts, according to the results of a new study published online ...

Nov 09, 2015
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How to manage pain in the ER: Ask the patient

Simply asking the question, "Do you want more pain medication?" resulted in satisfactory pain control in 99 percent of emergency department patients participating in a study. The study of a new evidence-based protocol to ...

Jun 12, 2015
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EpiPens save lives but can cut like a knife

Epinephrine autoinjectors can be life-saving for patients experiencing anaphylaxis - a life-threatening emergency - but a new case series published online Tuesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine identifies design features ...

Oct 08, 2015
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Multi-tasking in the ER: More is not better

Even after emergency physicians had acclimated to a new commercial electronic health record (EHR), they increased their tasks performed per minute by nearly 12 percent, increasing the potential for patient safety hazards. ...

Sep 22, 2015
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For kids with injured ankles, less treatment may be more

Emergency physicians can safely reduce x-rays in children with hurt ankles by as much as 23 percent and save emergency patients both money and time. The results of a cost analysis of the Low Risk Ankle Rule (LRAR) were published ...

Jul 20, 2015
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