Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute was formed in 1992 for the purposes of funding biomedical research. Specifically genome sequencing efforts. It is the largest charity in the U.K., and receives a majority of its funds from the Wellcome Trust. The Institute is responsible for the completion of the sequencing of approximately 1/3 of the human genome and model genomes of the mouse and zebrafish and more than 90 pathogen genomes. Today, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has been able to attract top scientists and has more than 30 Senior Researchers on staff. The Institute is located in Hinxton, Cambridge, U.K., and spends approximately 650 British Pounds annually to support relevant research by preeminent scientists and labs around the globe. The Institute supports work at the University of Nottingham, MIT, University of Toronto, University of Gothenburg, University of Manchester and other institutions of higher learning research labs.

Address
Hinxton, Cambs, CB10 1SA, UK
E-mail
press.officer@sanger.ac.uk
Fax
+44 (0)1223 494 919
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Pathway between gut and liver regulates bone mass

Researchers have uncovered a previously unknown biological process involving vitamin B12 and taurine that regulates the production of new bone cells. This pathway could be a potential new target for osteoporosis treatment.

Jun 09, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

A genetic analysis of skin development

(Medical Xpress)—Researchers report the first comprehensive analysis of genes that affect a single tissue. Genes don't act in isolation and it is only by studying the effects of many genes that scientists ...

May 20, 2014
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Cancer therapy may be too targeted

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Mar 16, 2014
popularity 4.2 / 5 (6) | comments 0

11,000-year-old living dog cancer reveals its secrets

Scientists have sequenced the genome of the world's oldest continuously surviving cancer, a transmissible genital cancer that affects dogs. This cancer, which causes grotesque genital tumours in dogs around ...

Jan 23, 2014
popularity 4.7 / 5 (11) | comments 1 | with audio podcast