Guidelines say diet, exercise, weight control improve odds after cancer diagnosis

April 26th, 2012 in Cancer /

New guidelines from the American Cancer Society say for many cancers, maintaining a healthy weight, getting adequate physical activity, and eating a healthy diet can reduce the chance of recurrence and increase the likelihood of disease-free survival after a diagnosis. The recommendations are included in newly released Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines for Cancer Survivors, published early online in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Increasing evidence shows that for many cancers, excess weight, lack of exercise, and increase the risk of cancer recurrence and reduce the likelihood of disease-free and overall survival for . "The data suggests that , just like everyone else, benefit from these important steps," said Colleen Doyle MS RD, director of nutrition and physical activity and co-author of the guidelines. "While we've published previous reports outlining the evidence on the impact of nutrition and physical activity on cancer recurrence and survival, this is the first time the evidence has been strong enough to release formal guidelines for survivorship, as we've done for . Living a physically active lifestyle and eating a healthy diet should absolutely be top of mind for anyone who's been diagnosed with cancer. "

The report was last updated in 2006, and was first created in 2001. For the update, a group of experts in nutrition, physical activity, and cancer survivorship evaluated the scientific evidence and best related to optimal nutrition and physical activity after the diagnosis of cancer. Among the review's conclusions:

"As more people survive cancer, there is increasing interest in finding information about food choices, physical activity, and dietary supplements to improve treatment outcomes, quality of life, and overall survival," said Doyle. "Our report summarizes the findings of this expert panel, and is intended to present health care providers with the best possible information with which to help cancer survivors and their families make informed choices related to nutrition and physical activity."

The recommendations also include specific guidance for people diagnosed with breast, colorectal, endometrial, ovarian, lung, prostate, head and neck, and hematologic cancers. It also includes a section with answers to common questions about alcohol, organic foods, sugar, supplements, and several other areas of interest.

Provided by American Cancer Society

"Guidelines say diet, exercise, weight control improve odds after cancer diagnosis." April 26th, 2012. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-04-guidelines-diet-weight-odds-cancer.html