Experts call for clinical trials to test non-skeletal benefits of vitamin D

May 18th, 2012 in Health /

The Endocrine Society's new scientific statement published online today represents the first comprehensive evaluation of both the basic and clinical evidence related to the non-skeletal effects of vitamin D. The statement addresses current research regarding the associations of vitamin D with immune function, hypertension, stroke, skin conditions and maternal/fetal health.

Vitamin D is a that regulates calcium and phosphate levels in the bloodstream and promotes healthy . is common throughout the world and results in abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus and which can lead to muscle weakness, osteomalacia, osteopenia and osteoporosis. While some have shown that benefits of vitamin D may extend beyond bone health, research findings remain inconsistent.

"The role of vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of chronic non-skeletal diseases remains to be determined," says Clifford Rosen, MD, of Tufts University School of Medicine and chair of the task force that authored the statement. "We need large and dose-response data to test the effects of vitamin D on chronic disease outcomes including autoimmunity, obesity, diabetes, hypertension and heart disease."

The scientific statement outlines the evidence that defines the effects of vitamin D on epidermal, neuromuscular, maternal/fetal and neoplastic () tissues. The authors critically evaluated the literature for each organ system utilizing available evidence from observational studies and to determine the strength of associations between vitamin D and tissue-specific outcomes.

Conclusions from the statement include:

The article, "The Nonskeletal Effects of Vitamin D: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement," appears in the June 2012 issue of The Endocrine Society's Endocrine Reviews.

Provided by The Endocrine Society

"Experts call for clinical trials to test non-skeletal benefits of vitamin D." May 18th, 2012. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-05-experts-clinical-trials-non-skeletal-benefits.html