Team publish in the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care

January 22nd, 2013 in HIV & AIDS /

New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) researchers Michele G. Shedlin, PhD, and Joyce K. Anastasi, PhD, DrNP, FAAN, LAc, published a paper, "Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines and Supplements by Mexican-Origin Patients in a U.S.–Mexico Border HIV Clinic," in the on-line version of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care.

Complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and therapies are often used to improve or maintain overall health and to relieve the side effects of or symptoms associated with such as HIV infection.

CAM can be categorized into such as yoga and meditation; natural products such as botanicals, vitamins, and minerals; body-based therapies such as massage; and culturally based healing traditions such as Ayurveda, , and curanderismo or folk healing.

The researchers drew data from a study investigating the influence of institutional and on adherence to antiretroviral (ARV) medications by Mexican-origin persons living with HIV (PWLH) on the U.S.–Mexico border and seeking treatment at a clinic in El Paso, Texas.

"Seeking access to medical care and/or medicines is a traditional pattern of cross-border movement in both directions on the U.S.–Mexico border," said Dr. Shedlin. " In fact, most of our had, at some time, sought services and/or lived on both sides of the border."

Among 113 participants, many individuals reported using complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) to support general health and their immune systems and to address symptoms of HIV-related diseases and ARV side effects.

CAM were seen as complementing ARV treatment; however, CAM use was often not reported to out of concern about disapproval and loss of care privileges. Furthermore, women and men participants reported their willingness to learn about and to try various new strategies and remedies that borrowed from emerging traditions of healing.

"This finding challenges researchers and providers to consider how Hispanic populations, with their CAM use, may exhibit the hybridization of health and healing," said Dr. Anastasi. "Information on CAM use needs to be available to providers to assess the benefits and contraindications of use and to develop realistic and effective care strategies."

Clinical Considerations

Provided by New York University

"Team publish in the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care." January 22nd, 2013. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-01-team-publish-journal-association-nurses.html