Academics launch new clinically approved diet, that can help lower the risk of breast cancer

February 15th, 2013 in Cancer /

Two academics from The University of Manchester have come up with a new diet which they believe can help lower the risk of breast cancer.

The 2-Day-Diet has been developed over years of research by award-winning research dietician, Dr Michelle Harvie, and internationally renowned Professor of Oncology, Tony Howell, who are both based at the Genesis Prevention Centre at University Hospital of South Manchester, and at The University of Manchester.

Dr Harvie and Professor Howell have been researching the links between diet, breast cancer and weight loss for the past 12 years. Following the results from a previous study of 34,000 women, which showed that a sustained 5% weight loss resulted in a 22 to 40 percent reduction in , they then set out to develop an easy-to-follow diet that people were likely to stick to.

The 2-Day Diet is nutritionally balanced, safe and easy to follow. To reach your perfect weight, all you need to do is follow a low-carb, for two days a week. For the rest of the week you simply eat normally, but sensibly – ideally eating a healthy Mediterranean style diet.

As The 2-Day Diet helps fol¬lowers retrain their appetites, they will find themselves naturally inclined to eat less, even on non-restricted days. Another added benefit is that the diet maximises loss of fat, but minimizes loss of muscle.

Dieting for two days a week and still losing weight might sound too good to be true, but in clinical trials, followers of The 2-Day-Diet lost twice as much fat and more centimetres around their waist than those on a continuous calorie-controlled diet. Research showed that this new approach to weight-loss can work even for serial , and followers of The 2-Day Diet were also much more likely to keep off the weight they had lost than those who followed conventional calorie controlled diets.

Dr Harvie and Professor Howell have proved that The 2-Day Diet also has numerous health benefits associated with it, including: reducing insulin and levels of other hormones and inflammation in the body known to cause cancer, lowering high blood pressure, and improving well-being, mood and energy levels. It is a unique way of eating and one that has been shown to help rejuvenate the body on a cellular level.

Provided by University of Manchester

"Academics launch new clinically approved diet, that can help lower the risk of breast cancer." February 15th, 2013. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-02-academics-clinically-diet-breast-cancer.html