News tagged with bleeding

Related topics: patients

New blood thinner beats older drug for vein clots

(HealthDay)—People who need to take a blood thinner because they've had a clot in the deep veins of their legs appear to do better with the new drug Pradaxa (dibigatran) than with the older drug warfarin, ...

Feb 20, 2013
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Video capsule accurately detects intestinal blood

(HealthDay)—Video capsule endoscopy can be safely and accurately used to detect blood in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage seen in emergency departments, according to a study published ...

Feb 18, 2013
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Dental plaque bacteria may trigger blood clots

Oral bacteria that escape into the bloodstream are able to cause blood clots and trigger life-threatening endocarditis. Further research could lead to new drugs to tackle infective heart disease, say scientists presenting ...

Mar 26, 2012
popularity not rated yet | comments 0 | with audio podcast

New clue to brain bleeding after stroke treatment

The only medication currently approved for stroke treatment – tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), which dissolves blood clots – is associated with an increased risk of bleeding in the brain, particularly among patients ...

Oct 17, 2011
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Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences) is the loss of blood from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, or anus, or through a break in the skin. The complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination, and desanguination is a massive blood loss. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10-15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8-10% of the donor's blood volume.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA