News tagged with botulism

Dairy CEO: Infant formula botulism scare is over

The chief executive of New Zealand dairy giant Fonterra said Wednesday the risk that people could contract botulism from infant formula made with the company's whey concentrate has ended.

Aug 07, 2013
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China, Russia halt some NZ dairy imports

(AP)—A botulism scare has prompted China and Russia to stop importing New Zealand milk powder and other dairy products, denting the country's reputation as a supplier of safe, high quality food.

Aug 05, 2013
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Pharma's niche focus spurs US aid for antibiotics

(AP) -- The pharmaceutical industry won approval to market a record number of new drugs for rare diseases last year, as a combination of scientific innovation and business opportunity spurred new treatments for diseases ...

Jan 25, 2012
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US approves Botox for bladder control

The face-freezing pharmaceutical injection Botox gained another medical use on Wednesday when the US government approved it for use in some patients with overactive bladder.

Aug 24, 2011
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Botulism

Botulism (Latin, botulus, "sausage") also known as botulinus intoxication is a rare but serious paralytic illness caused by botulinum toxin which is metabolic waste produced under anaerobic conditions by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, and affecting a wide range of mammals, birds and fish.

The toxin enters the human body in one of three ways: by colonization of the digestive tract by the bacterium in children (infant botulism) or adults (adult intestinal toxemia), by ingestion of toxin from foods (foodborne botulism) or by contamination of a wound by the bacterium (wound botulism). Person to person transmission of botulism does not occur.

All forms lead to paralysis that typically starts with the muscles of the face and then spreads towards the limbs. In severe forms, it leads to paralysis of the breathing muscles and causes respiratory failure. In light of this life-threatening complication, all suspected cases of botulism are treated as medical emergencies, and public health officials are usually involved to prevent further cases from the same source.

Botulism can be prevented by killing the spores by pressure cooking or autoclaving at 121 °C (250 °F) for 3 minutes or providing conditions that prevent the spores from growing. The toxin itself is destroyed by normal cooking processes - that is, boiling for a few minutes. Additional precautions for infants include not feeding them honey.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA