News tagged with brain waves

Related topics: brain , proceedings of the national academy of sciences , brain activity , electrical activity

A unique look into mild traumatic brain injuries

(Medical Xpress)—University of Maryland Department of Mechanical Engineering faculty and graduate students have published new research in the Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials that c ...

Oct 31, 2013
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Schizophrenia linked to abnormal brain waves

Schizophrenia patients usually suffer from a breakdown of organized thought, often accompanied by delusions or hallucinations. For the first time, MIT neuroscientists have observed the neural activity that ...

Oct 16, 2013
popularity 4.9 / 5 (14) | comments 6 | with audio podcast

How sleep helps brain learn motor task

You take your piano lesson, you go to sleep and when you wake up your fingers are better able to play that beautiful sequence of notes. How does sleep make that difference? A new study helps to explain what ...

Aug 20, 2013
popularity 4.3 / 5 (6) | comments 2 | with audio podcast

Neural simulations hint at the origin of brain waves

For almost a century, scientists have been studying brain waves to learn about mental health and the way we think. Yet the way billions of interconnected neurons work together to produce brain waves remains unknown. Now, ...

Jul 24, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (5) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma and encephalopathies. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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