News tagged with cell surface

Related topics: cells , immune response , cancer cells , protein

What autism can teach us about brain cancer

Applying lessons learned from autism to brain cancer, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered why elevated levels of the protein NHE9 add to the lethality of the most common and aggressive ...

Feb 09, 2015
popularity 196 comments 10

New target for prostate cancer treatment discovered

Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) scientists have found a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The findings offer evidence that a newly discovered member of a family ...

Feb 20, 2015
popularity 60 comments 0

Applying proteomics to Parkinson's

(Medical Xpress)—Scientists studying two genes that are mutated in an early-onset form of Parkinson's disease have deciphered how normal versions of these genes collaborate to help rid cells of damaged ...

Oct 03, 2014
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New clue to autism found inside brain cells

The problems people with autism have with memory formation, higher-level thinking and social interactions may be partially attributable to the activity of receptors inside brain cells, researchers at Washington ...

Mar 26, 2014
popularity 0 comments 1

Genetic risk factor for premature birth found

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a genetic risk factor for premature birth. The risk factor is related to a gene that codes for a protein that the ...

May 06, 2014
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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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