News tagged with cognitive tests

Related topics: dementia

Better memory at ideal temperature

People's working memory functions better if they are working in an ambient temperature where they feel most comfortable. That is what Leiden psychologists Lorenza Colzato and Roberta Sellaro conclude after having conducted ...

Apr 16, 2014
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Eating fish, nuts may not help thinking skills after all

Contrary to earlier studies, new research suggests that omega-3 fatty acids may not benefit thinking skills. The study is published in the September 25, 2013, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academ ...

Sep 25, 2013
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Older is wiser, at least economically

The brains of older people are slowing but experience more than makes up for the decline, a University of California, Riverside assistant professor of management and several colleagues found when asking the participants a ...

Sep 24, 2013
popularity 2.5 / 5 (2) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Cognitive test

Cognitive tests are assessments of the cognitive capabilities of humans and animals. Tests administered to humans include various forms of IQ tests; those administered to animals include the mirror test (a test of visual self-awareness) and the T maze test (which tests learning ability). Such study is important to research concerning the philosophy of mind and psychology, as well as determination of human and animal intelligence.

Modern cognitive tests originated through the work of Sir Francis Galton who coined the term "mental tests". Consistent with views of the late nineteenth century, most of his measurements were physical and physiological, rather than "mental". For instance he measured strength of grip and height and weight. He established an "Anthropometric Laboratory" in the 1880's where patrons paid to have physical and physiological attributes measured to estimate their intelligence. So, his measures of mental or cognitive components were not successful in modern terms, although his indirect effects were arguably enormous. His work influenced later researchers who developed better measures of intelligence using cognitive tests (see Alfred Binet , Raymond Cattell and Lewis Terman).

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA