News tagged with dehydration

Related topics: water , cholera

Reappraisal of hydration guidelines

Surprising results of a study on dehydration and athletic performance will encourage greater analysis of the subject among the science community, according to researchers involved.

Dec 02, 2013
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Athletes not slowed by dehydration, study finds

(Medical Xpress)—New research led by Murdoch University and Edith Cowan University has shed new light on a long-held belief that dehydration causes a decrease in high-level athletic performance.

Oct 01, 2013
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Dehydration likely among young athletes, research finds

(Medical Xpress)—Even when young players have water available while practicing soccer, they still became dehydrated, a University of Arkansas researcher found in a field study in Greece. Stavros Kavouras, an assistant professor ...

Aug 01, 2013
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Dehydration a problem in combat sports

Athletes in combat sports often try to shed body weight in order to compete against lighter and smaller opponents. A new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, points to the human body's limited ability ...

May 02, 2013
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TEDMED: The 'Zombie doctor apocalypse' is here

(HealthDay)—Physicians, wake up! You no longer need to be one of the walking dead. You have the power to create positive change and return to the reason you chose this career in the first place, according ...

Apr 22, 2013
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Dehydration

In physiology and medicine, dehydration (hypohydration) is defined as the excessive loss of body fluid. It is literally the removal of water (Ancient Greek: ὕδωρ hýdōr) from an object; however, in physiological terms, it entails a deficiency of fluid within an organism. Dehydration of skin and mucous membranes can be called medical dryness.

There are three types of dehydration: hypotonic or hyponatremic (primarily a loss of electrolytes, sodium in particular), hypertonic or hypernatremic (primarily a loss of water), and isotonic or isonatremic (equal loss of water and electrolytes). In humans, the most commonly seen type of dehydration by far is isotonic (isonatraemic) dehydration which effectively equates with hypovolemia, but the distinction of isotonic from hypotonic or hypertonic dehydration may be important when treating people who become dehydrated. Physiologically, dehydration, despite the name, does not simply mean loss of water, as water and solutes (mainly sodium) are usually lost in roughly equal quantities to how they exist in blood plasma. In hypotonic dehydration, intravascular water shifts to the extravascular space, exaggerating intravascular volume depletion for a given amount of total body water loss. Neurological complications can occur in hypotonic and hypertonic states. The former can lead to seizures, while the latter can lead to osmotic cerebral edema upon rapid rehydration.

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