News tagged with drinking water

Related topics: environmental protection agency · water · health risks · contaminants · groundwater

A slow burning natural disaster

Sometime in the next several days, monsoon rains will begin to sweep across India and gradually move northward, offering drenching relief to thousands caught in this year's relentless heat wave. Andhra Pradesh, one of the ...

Jun 04, 2015
popularity10 comments 0

Quenching the thirst for clean, safe water

It is estimated that one in nine people globally lack access to safe water. Michigan State University researchers are looking to fill that critical need and provide safe drinking water to the most remote locations in the ...

Apr 29, 2015
popularity8 comments 0

Beyond taps and toilets in Alaska

Safe, clean drinking water and sewerage facilities are basic necessities you would hope to find in one of the wealthiest countries in the world. But that's not always the case in the US.

Mar 17, 2015
popularity4 comments 6

Making water first for thirst

Nutrition scientists issued their findings to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) last month on the proposed 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. During the open ...

Mar 16, 2015
popularity4 comments 0

Drinking water

Drinking water is water of sufficiently high quality that it can be consumed or used without risk of immediate or long term harm. Such water is commonly called potable water. In most developed countries, the water supplied to households, commerce and industry is all of drinking water standard, even though only a very small proportion (often 5% or less) is actually consumed or used in food preparation.[citation needed]

Over large parts of the world, humans have inadequate access to potable water and use sources contaminated with disease vectors, pathogens or unacceptable levels of dissolved chemicals or suspended solids. Such water is not potable and drinking or using such water in food preparation leads to widespread acute and chronic illness and is a major cause of death in many countries.

Typically, water supply networks deliver potable water, whether it is to be used for drinking, washing or landscape irrigation. One counterexample is urban China, where drinking water can optionally be delivered by a separate tap.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Subscribe to rss feed