News tagged with electroencephalography

Related topics: brain

Scientists in sleep-wake tests decode dreams

What's in a dream? For Yukiyasu Kamitani, the question is important. He has been testing how dreams relate to brain activity and what really is the function of dreaming, He leads a team of researchers at the ATR Computational ...

Oct 29, 2012
popularity 5 / 5 (2) | comments 2 | with audio podcast report

When the mind controls the machines

More than a hundred patients suffering from severe motor impairments have voluntarily participated in the development of non-invasive brain-machine interfaces. The main purpose of these machines is to allow ...

Jan 24, 2013
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

A new tool for brain research

Physicists and neuroscientists from The University of Nottingham and University of Birmingham have unlocked one of the mysteries of the human brain, thanks to new research using functional Magnetic Resonance ...

Jul 31, 2013
popularity 4.3 / 5 (3) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma and encephalopathies. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques such as MRI and CT.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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