News tagged with epidemic

Related topics: outbreak , world health organization , flu , infectious diseases , influenza

Thin people get diabetes too

Pointing the finger at fat as the major or sole contributor to contracting type 2 diabetes is misleading and wrongly promotes the idea that the condition is entirely self-induced, research at Flinders University has found.

Aug 05, 2013
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A healthy side effect of diabetes drug

(Medical Xpress)—New research has shown the promising potential of a glucose-regulating drug to improve the condition of arteries for diabetes sufferers, possibly protecting them against heart attack or ...

Sep 23, 2013
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Could turning on a gene prevent diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 % of cases of diabetes around the world, afflicting 2.5 million Canadians and costing over 15 billion dollars a year in Canada. It is a severe health condition which makes body cells incapable ...

Jul 22, 2013
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"Sugar is the new tobacco," says expert

Professor Simon Capewell, from the University of Liverpool's Institute of Psychology, Health and Society is part of a campaign, `Action on Sugar', aimed at reducing the amount of added sugar in food and soft ...

Jan 09, 2014
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Why do new strains of HIV spread slowly

Most HIV epidemics are still dominated by the first strain that entered a particular population. New research published in PLOS Computational Biology offers an explanation of why the global mixing of HIV ...

Feb 05, 2015
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Epidemic

In epidemiology, an epidemic (from Greek epi- upon + demos people) occurs when new cases of a certain disease, in a given human population, and during a given period, substantially exceed what is "expected," based on recent experience (the number of new cases in the population during a specified period of time is called the "incidence rate"). (An epizootic is the analogous circumstance within an animal population.) In recent usages, the disease is not required to be communicable; examples include cancer or heart disease.

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