News tagged with fructose

Related topics: insulin resistance

Any added sugar is bad sugar, some experts contend

(HealthDay)—High-fructose corn syrup has long been portrayed as a major villain in the American diet. But a new school of thought contends that plain old table sugar or even all-natural honey can be just ...

Jun 20, 2015
popularity 441 comments 10

Fructose powers a vicious circle

ETH researchers have found a hitherto unknown molecular mechanism that is driven by fructose and can lead to cardiac enlargement and heart failure.

Jun 17, 2015
popularity 700 comments 2

Fructose more toxic than table sugar in mice

When University of Utah biologists fed mice sugar in doses proportional to what many people eat, the fructose-glucose mixture found in high-fructose corn syrup was more toxic than sucrose or table sugar, ...

Jan 05, 2015
popularity 273 comments 0

Paving the way for a fructose tolerance test

Increased consumption of table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup has been linked to rising rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the United States and throughout the world. Both sweeteners are commonly found in processed ...

Oct 13, 2014
popularity 0 comments 0

Fatty liver disease prevented in mice

(Medical Xpress)—Studying mice, researchers have found a way to prevent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Blocking a path that delivers dietary ...

Jun 03, 2014
popularity 0 comments 1

Fructose

Fructose (also levulose or laevulose) is a simple reducing sugar found in many foods and is one of the three important dietary monosaccharides along with glucose and galactose. Honey, tree fruits, berries, melons, and some root vegetables, such as beets, sweet potatoes, parsnips, and onions, contain fructose, usually in combination with glucose in the form of sucrose. Fructose is also derived from the digestion of granulated table sugar (sucrose), a disaccharide consisting of glucose and fructose.

Crystalline fructose and high-fructose corn syrup are often mistakenly confused as the same product. The former is produced from a fructose-enriched corn syrup which results in a finished product of at least 98% fructose. The latter is usually supplied as a mixture of nearly equal amounts of fructose and glucose.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA