News tagged with gluten

'Gluten-free' labeling standards kick in

Starting this week, "gluten-free" labels on packaged foods have real meaning. Until now, the term "gluten-free" had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means.

Aug 05, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (1) | comments 0

The pros and cons of going gluten-free

The number of Americans adopting gluten-free diets has grown dramatically over the past several years. Some avoid eating wheat, barley, and rye because they have an autoimmune disorder called celiac disease, ...

Jul 16, 2014
popularity 3.5 / 5 (8) | comments 0

Top 5 myths about gluten

In the past few years there has been a surge in gluten-free diets and products that claim giving up the protein can lead to healthier lifestyles. A New York Times article recently cited Mintel, a market research ...

Jun 06, 2014
popularity 3.6 / 5 (20) | comments 2

The molecular heart of celiac disease revealed

Australian, US and Dutch researchers have determined the molecular details of the interaction between the immune system and gluten that triggers celiac disease. Their work opens the way to potential treatments ...

Apr 29, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (5) | comments 1

Gluten

Gluten (from Latin gluten, "glue") is a protein composite found in foods processed from wheat and related grain species, including barley and rye. It gives elasticity to dough, helping it to rise and to keep its shape, and often giving the final product a chewy texture.

Gluten is the composite of a gliadin and a glutelin, which is conjoined with starch in the endosperm of various grass-related grains. The prolamin and glutelin from wheat (gliadin, which is alcohol-soluble, and glutenin, which is only soluble in dilute acids or alkalis) compose about 80% of the protein contained in wheat seed. Being insoluble in water, they can be purified by washing away the associated starch. Worldwide, gluten is a source of protein, both in foods prepared directly from sources containing it, and as an additive to foods otherwise low in protein.

The seeds of most flowering plants have endosperms with stored protein to nourish embryonic plants during germination. True gluten, with gliadin and glutenin, is limited to certain members of the grass family. The stored proteins of maize and rice are sometimes called glutens, but their proteins differ from gluten.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA